PARK(ing) Day 2015 Recap

A cluster of parklets on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC organized by the Council of the District of Columbia, DC UrbanGreens, Living Classrooms, the Anacostia Watershed Society, the Nature Conservancy, Washington Area Bicyclist Association, and Washington Parks & People for PARK(ing) Day 2015 image: Alexandra Hay
A cluster of parklets on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC organized by the Council of the District of Columbia, DC UrbanGreens, Living Classrooms, the Anacostia Watershed Society, the Nature Conservancy, Washington Area Bicyclist Association, and Washington Parks & People for PARK(ing) Day 2015
image: Alexandra Hay

This past Friday, September 18, you may have noticed a few new inhabitants taking over parking spaces all across the country. Instead of cars, you might have seen pop-up sitting areas, outdoor reading rooms, play spaces, picnic areas, or any number of alternate uses—all for PARK(ing) Day 2015.

Taking place the third Friday in September since 2005, PARK(ing) Day began with a single parking space re-imagined as a temporary public place by the San Francisco art and design studio Rebar. For more on PARK(ing) Day’s origins and story, check out Rebar’s PARK(ing) Day Manual and Manifesto.

Creators of parklets this year included many chapters of ASLA, students, landscape architecture and design firms, small businesses, nonprofits, and many more—see ASLA’s PARK(ing) Day map for a sense of the geographic breadth and organizational scope of this year’s parklets.

And, new this year, the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) also created a parklet in front of ASLA headquarters in the Chinatown neighborhood of Washington, DC. Here in Washington, the District Department of Transportation once again organized the application and permitting process for PARK(ing) Day pop-up spaces, and the city hosted 32 parklets this year, up from 18 in 2014—impressive growth over just one year.

Below, we take a look at more than a dozen PARK(ing) Day spaces around Washington, DC. From inviting sitting areas to mini-golf, these spaces highlight the potential a single parking space holds to host a plethora of different functions.

New this year: the American Society of Landscape Architects organized a parklet for (PARK)ing Day image: Alexandra Hay
New this year: the American Society of Landscape Architects organized a parklet for (PARK)ing Day
image: Alexandra Hay
Landscape architecture and urban design firm Lee and Associate's parking spot featured a bike-powered charging station image: Alexandra Hay
Landscape architecture and urban design firm Lee and Associate‘s parking spot featured a bike-powered charging station
image: Alexandra Hay
DC UrbanGreen's spot on Pennsylvania Avenue image: Alexandra Hay
DC UrbanGreen‘s spot on Pennsylvania Avenue
image: Alexandra Hay
New uses for old tires at ZGF Architects' parklet image: Alexandra Hay
New uses for old tires at ZGF Architects‘ parklet
image: Alexandra Hay
HKS Architects' dog-friendly space image: Alexandra Hay
HKS Architects‘ dog-friendly space
image: Alexandra Hay
Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company's parklet image: Alexandra Hay
Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company‘s parklet
image: Alexandra Hay
The American Public Health Association's parklet featured a hydration station and other resources image: Alexandra Hay
The American Public Health Association‘s parklet featured a hydration station and other resources
image: Alexandra Hay
The Mayor's Office on Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs' parklet image: Alexandra Hay
The Mayor’s Office on Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs‘ parklet
image: Alexandra Hay
Not just for (PARK)ing Day: the Golden Triangle BID / Gensler space is Washington, DC's first long-term parklet image: Alexandra Hay
Not just for (PARK)ing Day: the Golden Triangle BID / Gensler space is Washington, DC’s first long-term parklet
image: Alexandra Hay
Project for Public Spaces' curbside sitting area image: Alexandra Hay
Project for Public Spaces‘ curbside sitting area
image: Alexandra Hay
Urban Land Institute's parklet, designed by Lancaster Architects, included seating, mini-golf, and shipping palette walls image: Alexandra Hay
Urban Land Institute‘s parklet, designed by Lancaster Architects, included seating, mini-golf, and shipping palette walls
image: Alexandra Hay
The parklet outside Baked & Wired in Georgetown featured reclaimed railroad tracks as seating image: Alexandra Hay
The parklet outside Baked & Wired in Georgetown featured reclaimed railroad tracks as seating
image: Alexandra Hay
At Luke's Lobster, cornhole and ample seating for a 'Sustainable Lobster Workshop' later in the day image: Alexandra Hay
At Luke’s Lobster, cornhole and ample seating for a ‘Sustainable Lobster Workshop’ later in the day
image: Alexandra Hay
A great way to draw people in: having a puppy call your parklet home for a day image: Alexandra Hay
A great way to draw people in: having a puppy call your parklet home for a day
image: Alexandra Hay

We hope you had a chance to design or just stop by a parklet or two for PARK(ing) Day this year. With the number of parklets in Washington, DC alone nearly doubling in just one year, this is an event that is sure to continue its phenomenal growth. For more pictures from across the country, follow #ASLAPD.

One thought on “PARK(ing) Day 2015 Recap

  1. Alex Belano September 22, 2015 / 5:00 pm

    Hi Alexandra….nice pics and narrative!

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