The 2019 HALS Challenge Results: Historic Streetscapes

by Chris Stevens, ASLA

Carretera Central, HALS PR-2, San Juan, Caguas, Cayey, Aibonito, Coamo, Juana Diaz, and Ponce, Puerto Rico. / image: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

The results of the tenth annual Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) Challenge were announced at the HALS Meeting during the ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in San Diego on Saturday, November 16, 2019. Congratulations to the winners! Sponsored by the National Park Service, cash prizes were awarded to the top three submissions. This challenge resulted in the donation of 15 impressive HALS short format historical reports and a few measured drawings and large format photographs to the HALS collection.

2019 HALS Challenge: Historic Streetscapes

First Place: Carretera Central, HALS PR-2
Puerto Rico
by Teresita M. Del Valle, RA, ASLA

Second Place: Larchwood, HALS MA-5
Cambridge, Massachusetts
by Allison A. Crosbie, ASLA, Preservation Administrator, and Kathleen Rawlins, Assistant Director, City of Cambridge Historical Commission.

Third Place: Broad Street, HALS SC-20
Charleston, South Carolina
by John Bennett, Kayleigh Defenbaugh, Monica Hendricks, Tanesha High, Elliott Simon, and Rachel Wilson – Clemson University / College of Charleston. Faculty Sponsor: Carter L. Hudgins, Director, Graduate Program in Historic Preservation.

Honorable Mention: Main Street, HALS SC-21
Greenville, South Carolina
by Rebekah Lawrence, Associate ASLA

Larchwood, HALS MA-5, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. / image: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

The 11 other outstanding entries (alphabetical by state):

Winterhaven Neighborhood, HALS AZ-25
Class Project, LAR 597j, Documentation and Interpretation of the Historic Built Environment, College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, University of Arizona. Gina Chorover, Instructor. Graduate Students: Cody Bonnet, Paige Gniffke, Erica LeClaire, and Ali Wysopal.

Lytton Square, HALS CA-145
by Douglas Nelson, ASLA, RHAA Landscape Architects

San Francisco Boulevard, HALS CA-146
by Melissa Mourkas

The Sunset Strip, HALS CA-147
by Michael O’Brien

Overseas Highway, HALS FL-29
by Tricia Keffer, Associate ASLA

Ohio Boulevard, HALS IN-13
by Christopher Baas and Malcolm Cairns, FASLA, Department of Landscape Architecture, Ball State University

Virginia Avenue, HALS IN-14
by Dacia Case

Broadway, HALS NY-15
by Lara Friedmann, B. Thayer Associates

Euclid Avenue, HALS OH-14
by P. Jeffrey Knopp, ASLA

Butler Street, HALS PA-34
by Rebekah A. Johnston, MLA, ASLA

King Street, HALS VA-80
by Shannon Buchele, student in LAR 497j: Documentation and Interpretation of the Historic Built Environment, College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, University of Arizona. Gina Chorover, Instructor.

Broad Street, HALS SC-20, Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina. / image: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

The Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) was created in 2000 as a federal program to document historic landscapes in the United States and its territories. Documentation is critical to preserving these significant sites for the benefit of future generations. Like its companion programs, the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) and the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER), HALS produces written and graphic records used by educators, land managers, and preservation planners as well as the general public.

The National Park Service (NPS) administers the planning and operation of HALS, standardizes formats and develops guidelines for recording landscapes, and catalogs and/or publishes the information when appropriate. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) provides professional guidance and technical advice for the program through its Historic Preservation Professional Practice Network. The Library of Congress (LOC) accepts and preserves HALS documents, furnishes reproductions of material, and makes records available to the public.

Main Street, HALS SC-21, Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina. / image: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

The HALS office is continuing the challenge again in 2020 with a new theme, Vanishing or Lost Landscapes, chosen to encourage the documentation of these almost forgotten vestiges of America’s landscape history. Many historic American landscapes are under threat or have been lost. Threats include development pressure, neglect and climate change. You may increase historic landscape awareness with your local governments and preservation commissions by documenting vanishing or lost historic landscapes for HALS. Your HALS documentation will be archived by the Library of Congress for perpetuity and will allow future generations to learn about the site(s) you record.

Short format histories should be submitted to HALS at the NPS no later than July 31, 2020 (c/o Chris Stevens, 202-354-2146, Chris_Stevens@nps.gov). Sponsored by HALS, cash prizes will again be awarded to the top three submissions. Results will be announced at the ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in Miami Beach in October. Look for more information on the 2020 HALS Challenge here on The Field next month.

Thank you to all entrants for expanding the HALS collection and raising awareness of the historic streetscapes you documented!

Chris Stevens, ASLA, is NPS HALS Landscape Architect, past chair of the ASLA Historic Preservation Professional Practice Network (PPN), and past HALS Subcommittee chair / coordinator.

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